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ORIGINALLY POSTED ON: SEATTLE TIMES

Earthquake

Although a terrifying read, the New Yorker piece shouldn’t surprise Seattle Times readers. Science reporter Sandi Doughton wrote the book on the “really big one.” Literally.

“The Really Big One,” a story published this week on The New Yorker’s website and in the July 20 print issue, portends a massive earthquake crippling the Pacific Northwest.

It leaves little to the imagination about the consequences of “a full-margin rupture”:

“By the time the shaking has ceased and the tsunami has receded, the region will be unrecognizable. … FEMA projects that nearly thirteen thousand people will die in the Cascadia earthquake and tsunami. Another twenty-seven thousand will be injured, and the agency expects that it will need to provide shelter for a million displaced people, and food and water for another two and a half million.”

Although a terrifying read, the New Yorker piece shouldn’t surprise Seattle Times readers. Science reporter Sandi Doughton wrote the book on the “really big one.” Literally. Her 2013 release, “Full Rip 9.0,” describes the eventuality of a mega-quake in jarring detail. It also explains the science behind the Cascadia Subduction Zone.

Here’s the first chapter of Doughton’s book, excerpted in Pacific NW Magazine.

More of Doughton’s earthquake and tsunami reporting: